Thursday 24 April 2014
Advertise  |  Subscribe  |  Register  | 

Close

About cookies: we use cookies to support features like login and sharing articles. Keep cookies enabled to enjoy the full site experience. By browsing our site with cookies enabled, you are agreeing to their use. Review our cookies information for more details.

Buzzing with excitement

17.01.2013 / 03:10 CET
Trademark debate is all in the name of Fun Factory.
Well, this should improve the credibility of the European Union. Tomorrow (18 January), the European Court of Justice's general court is supposed to issue a ruling on a case brought by the German company Fun Factory, which, in case you did not know, is Europe's biggest manufacturer of erotic toys.

The company, which is based in the oh-so-erotic city of Bremen, filed an application with the EU's Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market (based in the hotter, but sterile, city of Alicante) for a community trademark on the shape of one of its vibrators.

Fun Factory said that the design, composed of three interlocking spheres, was unique and so merited a trademark. The worldly-wise OHIM was unmoved by a “graphic representation” of the device's shape and function, and rejected the claim, saying that it was not sufficiently distinctive to warrant a trademark.

The company then appealed against the ruling to the general court of the ECJ.
© 2014 European Voice. All rights reserved.
Varrow

Most viewed in Policies

Barnier proposes shake-up of corporate governance

Shareholders to get a say on directors' pay but will also face stricter transparency rules.

M.Barnier120710

A day of good news for the eurozone

The EU was cheered by positive news today. Portuguese bonds rose, Greece met its budget goals and business activity is growing at its fastest rate in years.

Moneynew

Passionate businesswoman You need an active subscription to read this article

Profile of Emma Marcegaglia – president of BusinessEurope.

profilemarcegaglia1004

Related articles

The EU was cheered by positive news today. Portuguese bonds rose, Greece met its budget goals and business activity is growing at its fastest rate in years.

If current trends continue it will take 20 years to achieve parity in national parliaments and 70 years to achieve equal pay.

Profile of Emma Marcegaglia – president of BusinessEurope.

Shareholders to get a say on directors' pay but will also face stricter transparency rules.

Compromise deal rules out making large companies report revenues on country-by-country basis.

Advertisement

Comments

 

Your comment
Please note: The fields followed by an asterisk (*) are obligatory fields

Comment*

Name*
E-mail*
Website

Please, copy the code on the left into the box on the right

 I accept the Terms & conditions
 I would like to share my e-mail & website

Advertisement

Cookies info | Privacy policy | Terms & conditions